1979: Outspoken women take centre stage in the Dracula narrative

There are many films based on Dracula by Bram Stoker. Few of them closely follow the novel. Instead they are adaptions that reflect the times they were made in. One of the most noteworthy is Dracula directed by John Badham in 1979. Kate Nelligan’s Lucy is portrayed as an outspoken woman who is in control. She is no longer a passive victim. The men who are the traditional heroes of the narrative are portrayed as corrupt, incompetent and oppressive.

Kate Nelligan takes the lead as Lucy

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From Buffy to Bella – has vampire fiction lost its teeth?

In Buffy the Vampire Slayer life is hell and there is no escape. In Twilight the maxim could be, “Life is dull: let’s buy things”…
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The Vampires’ Journey IV. The undead comes to the movies

SPOILER ALERT: Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror, Dir: F W Murnau 1922, Eclipse (movie and book), BtVS (Seasons One and Five), Dracula, Dir: Tod Browning, 1931

Max Shreck as Nosferatu in 1922

Ken Gelder observes of Dracula (and James Bond) movies that “these films each bear only a nominal relationship(s) to their literary source(s). Moreover as they begin to comprise a distinct genre, these films speak to themselves … much more than they to speak to any ‘original’ novel(s)”.[1] Each appearance of the iconic figure of Dracula in the cinema has seen a departure from Stoker’s novel. Each time this creates new sources of reference for what a vampire or Dracula should be.

Nosferatu and the heroines willing sacrifice

Dracula’s first appearance in film in the 1922 German production Nosferatu, directed by F W Murnau, retained the monstrous characterisation of the count. He appears as a Continue reading

The Vampires’ Journey II: The romantic friend of the 19th century

SPOILER ALERT: A mild spoiler of Twilight series books and films (New Moon and Eclipse)

Vampire fiction has been on quite a journey over the last two centuries. Early traditional folklore of vampires tell stories of monsters who rise from the dead as rotting corpses to devour their living families. They were more like our current notions of zombies in horror than the forever young and pretty vampires that currently hold sway.[1] Continue reading